Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!

Computer Technology

Basics
Computing devices are based on electro-optical integrated circuits and data transmission is primarily via fiber optic cables and photonic crystal plates, which are stronger, cooler and have higher data transmission speeds. Circuit boards are made of sheets of photonic crystal plates.

Photonic crystal plates (PCPs) consist of crystal plates coated with thin polymer photonic film. These plates are made by dissolving a base monomer in an organic solvent, which is placed in a growth cell with a crystal plate. The plate is painted with a laser, causing a thin polymer film to deposit in specific micron-sized, or smaller, patterns.This process is generally carried out in orbital factories due to convection problems. The organic films are more sensitive than inorganics to changes in light intensity and can perform a large number of functions such as switching, signal processing and frequency doubling while using less power than inorganic materials such as silicon. These films allow multiple frequencies of light to travel through the optical components without interference, allowing the photonic devices to process multiple streams of data simultaneously with much higher data rates for any one of these streams than electrical conductors, as well as avoiding the crosstalk difficulties of compressed electronics.

Memory/Data Storage
Memory technology is based on atomic holographic memory crystals, holding an average of 64 petabits (Pb) or 8 petabytes (PB) of data per cubic centimeter.

Datacards
Standard datacards measure 2.5mm x 5cm x 8cm. Even though their total volume is 10cm3, only half of it is actually used, giving them a 40PB capacity. Datacards can be rewritten an unlimited amount of times and do not suffer any data degradation over time. Standard datacard readers (datacard read/write devices) consist of a 2.5mm x 5cm slot which the datacard is inserted into completely.

Datachips
Standard datachips are 2.5mm x 1cm x 1cm and have a 2 PB capacity. Datachips are usually used for small devices such as wristcomps or subdermacomps. Other than their size, they function the same as datacards. Datachip readers are simply a tiny 2.5mm x 1cm slot.

Onboard Dataplates
Computer systems almost always have a built-in block of onboard dataplates. Onboard dataplates are usually 16 PB and measur 2.5mm x 8cm x 8cm, but this can vary. They are arranged in banks that plug into the main circuitplate and are accessed by opening up the computer casing.

Software

Common operating systems generally require several PB of disk space and hundreds of megabytes of RAM. Most personal applications range from 100 MB to 10 PN.
Programs are not simple text datafiles or simple databases; they may include artificial intelligence, voice recognition, video-recorded visual display imagery, and image recognition, at resolutions where pixels cannot be distinguished and sounds do not sound processed.

Displays

Displays are based on advanced long-lived OLED technology. Most displays are simple 2-D or very basic 3-D. The most advanced (and expensive) displays are Holographic Panstereoscopic Displays (HPDs) which generate a three-dimensional image inside the display area, with an unrestricted POV angle. Both types are touchscreen, Most displays are durable enough that everyday contact and even the occasional abuse leaves little or no wear on them. Most OLED or HPD include touchscreen technology.

Interfaces
Most computers utilise an OLED touchscreen "keyboard/mouse" interface (generally separate from the display). Some systems utilize a built-in voice/face command (VFC) recognition interface routine, but these take up significantly more memory. Programs using VFC recognition are usually driven by a robust AI.
Occassionally computers require other interface devices depending on their particular use.
Neural interfaces are in experimental stages, but are still considered dangerous and are very expensive.

Cables
Power cables are still sheathed copper wire bundles. Data cables are almost always fiber optic cables.

Power
Computers require very small amounts of power. The twomost power-intensive devices are datacard readers and HPD screens. Some computers have MFC (micro fuel cell) battery slots. MFC batteries can power a workstation for 72 hours, a portacomp for 14 days, or a wristcomp for 5 years. Subdermacomps are powered via bioelectric or hemapneumatic energy from the user's body, or micro glucose fuel cells. Workstations also typically have an external power port; they are only run off of MFC batteries when necessary.

Standard Computer Systems
Workstations
Workstations are the modern equivalant of the old desktop computer, and consist of a vertical display panel and a horizontal interface panel set into a stylish alloy case with various ports and slots on the sides and back of the case.
A typical workstation has 512PB of onboard dataspace, eight dataports, eight datacard slots and four datachip slots, a 30x45cm OLED display panel and a 15x45cm OLED interface panel. These weigh between four and five kg.

Tablets
Standard tablet computers are the modern equivalant of the laptop. A typical tablet has 256PB of onboard dataspace, two dataports, two datacard slots, two datachip slots, and a 30x20cm HPD display/interface panel and weighs around 1 kg

Personal Communications Device (PCD)
The Personal Communications Device (PCD) is the modern equivalant of the PDA. The standard PCD has between 64 and 128 PB of onboard dataspace, one dataport, one datacard slot and one datachip slot, and a 8x12cm OLED display/interface panel and weighs around 0.3 kg

Wristcomp
Wristcomps are basically tiny computers (about 3cm x 3cm x 1cm) secured to a wristwatch band. Wristcomps come standard with a 5 THz GaAs main processor, several compact subprocessors, 2PB of onboard dataspace, one dataport, one datachip slot, and a 3x3cm OLED display/interface panel.


Printers:

People still like to print things out on paper. Most people use paper made out of synthetic materials. Printers themselves are just as advanced as their computer counterparts. Three typical kinds of printers exist: Professional Printers, Standard Printers and Portable Printers. The image quality is the same on all three types; the only difference is their size, speed and cost. All print on standard pages: 20cm by 30cm. Specialized printers that can print on larger paper cost proportionally more (and decrease the printing speed proportionally as well). Professional Printer: consists of a 20cm by 25cm by 35cm case, and holds up to 1000 sheets (6cm) of paper at a time (but can be fitted with an external pagefeeder that can hold thousands of pages). Speed: 1200 pg/min Weight: 5 kg Standard Printer: consists of a 10cm by 25cm by 35cm case, and holds up to 500 sheets (3cm) of paper at a time (but can be fitted with an external pagefeeder that can hold thousands of pages). Speed: 240 pg/min Weight: 3 kg Portable Printer: consists of a 3cm by 5cm by 25cm bar, which draws pages from an external tray that can hold up to 100 sheets at a time. Speed: 120 pg/min Weight: 1 kg [edit] AIs AIs are still not truly self-aware; though advanced AI programs can seem very self-aware, true self-awareness and living intelligence has yet to be achieved. AIs come in a variety of complexities and personalities, so that people who dislike chatting with their computers can get simple AIs, while others often have a tailored AI personality managing their computers and as an interface assistant. Basic AI programs come standard in all computer systems and programs. [edit] Security Software Common operating systems generally require several PB of disk space and hundreds of megabytes of RAM. Most personal applications range from 100 MB to 10 PN. Programs are not simple text datafiles or simple databases; they may include artificial intelligence, voice recognition, video-recorded visual display imagery, and image recognition, at resolutions where pixels cannot be distinguished and sounds do not sound processed. [edit] Displays Displays are based on advanced long-lived OLED technology. Most displays are simple 2-D or very basic 3-D. The most advanced (and expensive) displays are Holographic Panstereoscopic Displays (HPDs) which generate a three-dimensional image inside the display area, with an unrestricted POV angle. Both types are touchscreen, Most displays are durable enough that everyday contact and even the occasional abuse leaves little or no wear on them. Most OLED or HPD include touchscreen technology. [edit] Interfaces Most computers utilise an OLED touchscreen "keyboard/mouse" interface (generally separate from the display). Some systems utilize a built-in voice/face command (VFC) recognition interface routine, but these take up significantly more memory. Programs using VFC recognition are usually driven by a robust AI. Occassionally computers require other interface devices depending on their particular use. Neural interfaces are in experimental stages, but are still considered dangerous and are very expensive. [edit] Cables Power cables are still sheathed copper wire bundles. Data cables are almost always fiber optic cables. [edit] Power Computers require very small amounts of power. The two most power-intensive devices are datacard readers and HPD screens. Some computers have MFC (micro fuel cell) battery slots. MFC batteries can power a workstation for 72 hours, a portacomp for 14 days, or a wristcomp for 5 years. Subdermacomps are powered via bioelectric or hemapneumatic energy from the user's body, or micro glucose fuel cells. Workstations also typically have an external power port; they are only run off of MFC batteries when necessary. [edit] Standard Computer Systems [edit] Workstations Workstations are the modern equivalant of the old desktop computer, and consist of a vertical display panel and a horizontal interface panel set into a stylish alloy case with various ports and slots on the sides and back of the case. A typical workstation has 512PB of onboard dataspace, eight dataports, eight datacard slots and four datachip slots, a 30x45cm OLED display panel and a 15x45cm OLED interface panel. These weigh between four and five kg. [edit] Tablets Standard tablet computers are the modern equivalant of the laptop. A typical tablet has 256PB of onboard dataspace, two dataports, two datacard slots, two datachip slots, and a 30x20cm HPD display/interface panel and weighs around 1 kg [edit] Personal Communications Device (PCD) The Personal Communications Device (PCD) is the modern equivalant of the PDA. The standard PCD has between 64 and 128 PB of onboard dataspace, one dataport, one datacard slot and one datachip slot, and a 8x12cm OLED display/interface panel and weighs around 0.3 kg [edit] Wristcomp Wristcomps are basically tiny computers (about 3cm x 3cm x 1cm) secured to a wristwatch band. Wristcomps come standard with a 5 THz GaAs main processor, several compact subprocessors, 2PB of onboard dataspace, one dataport, one datachip slot, and a 3x3cm OLED display/interface panel. [edit] Printers People still like to print things out on paper. Most people use paper made out of synthetic materials. Printers themselves are just as advanced as their computer counterparts. Three typical kinds of printers exist: Professional Printers, Standard Printers and Portable Printers. The image quality is the same on all three types; the only difference is their size, speed and cost. All print on standard pages: 20cm by 30cm. Specialized printers that can print on larger paper cost proportionally more (and decrease the printing speed proportionally as well). Professional Printer: consists of a 20cm by 25cm by 35cm case, and holds up to 1000 sheets (6cm) of paper at a time (but can be fitted with an external pagefeeder that can hold thousands of pages). Speed: 1200 pg/min Weight: 5 kg Standard Printer: consists of a 10cm by 25cm by 35cm case, and holds up to 500 sheets (3cm) of paper at a time (but can be fitted with an external pagefeeder that can hold thousands of pages). Speed: 240 pg/min Weight: 3 kg Portable Printer: consists of a 3cm by 5cm by 25cm bar, which draws pages from an external tray that can hold up to 100 sheets at a time. Speed: 120 pg/min Weight: 1 kg [edit] AIs AIs are still not truly self-aware; though advanced AI programs can seem very self-aware, true self-awareness and living intelligence has yet to be achieved. AIs come in a variety of complexities and personalities, so that people who dislike chatting with their computers can get simple AIs, while others often have a tailored AI personality managing their computers and as an interface assistant. Basic AI programs come standard in all computer systems and programs. [edit] Security Most computers come with biometric analysis subprocessors, using voiceprints, retinal scans, handprints and even facial scans. However, these measures are becoming easier to defeat. The cutting edge of security technology is geneprints and genelocks. While still a relatively new technology, geneprinting technology has matured enough that it is proved to be 100% reliable. Geneprinting involves a small scanner that someone can place any part of their skin on (a finger, for example). The genescanner reads numerous skin cells touching the scanning surface at the molecular level, analyzing their genetic code and comparing it to a genetic database. If the person's geneprint is in the database and marked as "authorized", the genescanner can activate whatever device it is hooked up to. Genescanners used as locks - called genelocks - can be installed into computers, doors, vehicles, and even guns in order to prevent unauthorized access. Genescanners can be fooled by using dead tissue (such as a dead person's finger) or even several layers of epidermis glued to someone's thumb. But the latest genescanners use several different methods to detect these kinds of tricks, and are now over 99% foolproof. Genelocks are used in various high-security places (large corporations, government installations, etc.) but they're not common and they're fairly rare in the public marketplace. The only detriment some see to genelocks is the idea of building genetic databases of people. Most computers come with biometric analysis subprocessors, using voiceprints, retinal scans, handprints and even facial scans. However, these measures are becoming easier to defeat. The cutting edge of security technology is geneprints and genelocks. While still a relatively new technology, geneprinting technology has matured enough that it is proved to be 100% reliable. Geneprinting involves a small scanner that someone can place any part of their skin on (a finger, for example). The genescanner reads numerous skin cells touching the scanning surface at the molecular level, analyzing their genetic code and comparing it to a genetic database. If the person's geneprint is in the database and marked as "authorized", the genescanner can activate whatever device it is hooked up to. Genescanners used as locks - called genelocks - can be installed into computers, doors, vehicles, and even guns in order to prevent unauthorized access. Genescanners can be fooled by using dead tissue (such as a dead person's finger) or even several layers of epidermis glued to someone's thumb. But the latest genescanners use several different methods to detect these kinds of tricks, and are now over 99% foolproof. Genelocks are used in various high-security places (large corporations, government installations, etc.) but they're not common and they're fairly rare in the public marketplace. The only detriment some see to genelocks is the idea of building genetic databases of people.